Judge Dredd The Man Comes Around 2000AD

RM Guera Draws Dredd
RM Guera Draws Dredd

The artist on the critically-acclaimed Scalped crime series for Vertigo, RM Guera, comes to the Judge Dredd Megazine next week with a one-short Judge Dredd story written by Rob Williams (Cla$$warDaken).

The Man Comes Around sees Guera bring his trademark gritty European style to Mega-City One as Judge Dredd investigates a series of explosive suicides. Williams also uses the eleven-page strip to examine the effect that age is having on the lawman, who is now officially in his 70s.

Coloured by Italian artist Giulia Brusco and lettered by Anne Parkhouse, The Man Comes Around will be published inJudge Dredd Megazine #344, which is available from Wednesday 15th January. It will be available day-and-date digital from the 2000 AD iPad app and DRM-free from the 2000 AD webshop, as well as in print in the UK and via Diamond in North America.

This Dredd story brings us a peek into the life and age of Dredd, we see a scared and aging man. We seem to be facing a crisis in our every day world at the moment, morality and death. Can anyone kill Dredd? I would say that too much money could be lost, the reader base is too vast, the readers no longer save up some pocket money, they pay a subscription. And rightly so, this piece is slick, it has all the elements that you come to expect from Dredd, given to you in just a few pages. It has that pop art feel still, the stories are still as good as ever. The gore is still keeping readers turning pages or clicking the mouse. The action is keeping us on our toes, we get straight into it…KABOOM!

Given a few bells and whistles to help the lawman complete his weekly task of fighting crime in Mega-City One, we as the reader are given a bit of poetic licence within the world of Dredd, we get to add our own words, “he swears at it and tells it to shut up”

The story is fairly simple, mild terror and another choice to make for Dredd ( I seem to be getting lots of choice based reviews ),  of course Dredd win’s through. The end of the piece we are given a set up for a new follow-on story.

All in all, set your alarms/reminders for this piece of Dredd. I feel lucky to have read this piece early, and I hope that you will agree with me. This story is still good, the art is as good as ever, long may Dredd continue

 

(note – cant put in images still brian)

Star Trek The Next Generation – Hive

Comic Book Review – Star Trek The Next Generation – Hive

Star Trek The Next Generation – Hive is the full story (all four issues of HIVE, as originally published), weighing in at a hefty 106 pages.

Star Trek TNG - HIVE Comic Book
Star Trek TNG – HIVE Comic Book

We first meet Locutus of Borg, for he is what Jean Luc Picard has become. No sooner do we learn he has a mission, than the story skips 500 years back to the time after he first returned to the federation as Jean Luc.

We are taken into memes more commonly seen in fantasy than SF – alternative timelines, parallel worlds, other realms (and the demons who live within); all far beyond that seen in the Q days, and further still than from within the likes of Babylon 5.

Swiftly reintroduced are a range of familiar characters – seven of nine is the Borg Ambassador, Riker is a Captain, Data is reborn as Borg; and the ubiquitous Dr Beverly Crusher. A fresh character appears, a Lieutenant whose brother was also assimilated at an unspecified time in the past.

The sequence flips back and forth in time, with clever use of parallel panels and cross break speech bubbles to show the same character spilt across two different time streams, and to visually and verbally smooth the passage between the two. It soon emerges that there has been a massive Borg ‘trick’ and we move into the realms of concurrent time streams where the future intervenes & uses temporal anomalies to time travel and destroy themselves as the strip hops back and forth, with fewer panels between.

The result is a balancing of worlds, and a return to the expected past and future, thus preserving the space-time continuum and the canon of Star Trek: The Next Generation as a whole.

Star Trek The Next Generation – Hive has artwork, by Joe Corroney and David Messina (with colours by Ilaria Traversi and Hi Fi) which is superb and makes good use of the verve and pace supplied by writer Brannon Braga. However this is firmly aimed at the 18+ end of the comics market, and contains themes that might be considered unsuitable for a younger person.

Doctor Who – Prisoners of Time. Issue 3

Doctor Who - Prisoners of Time. Issue 3
Doctor Who – Prisoners of Time. Issue 3, Written by Scott & David Tipton, art by Mike Collins. IDWv

Featuring the third Doctor and Sarah Jane Smith, Prisoners of time is set in the UNIT era. Amidst unusually fierce and pan-global storms, the emergency call goes out to recall The Doctor to UNIT. He and Sarah Jane arrive to find The Brigadier is acting very strangely, deploying troops all over the globe without wit or reference to others, and refusing to listen to any sort of reason. Eventually he makes one decision too far, and is able to be relieved of duty.

During restraint and treatment for apparent madness, the doctor spots the tell tale signs that the brigadier has been infected and is acting as host for an alien species. Following its expulsion from its host, The Doctor, Sarah Jane, and The Brigadier set about repelling the alien invasion force…
At the time this was a trail blazing strip, and part of what eventually became the modern Doctor Who Magazine.  As a protagonist, the 3rd Doctor is interesting in how little he uses the TARDIS to achieve access to places and solve issues.
This is issue three of the series, with more to come, and part of a slew of Doctor Who reprints that IDW is issuing in the run up to the 50th Anniversary.  Each issue contains information on this, and on the history of the strip to date. At $3.99 (UK pricing varies according to the conversion rate used by your local comic shop) for the paper issue, its a worthwhile spend; story and artwork both being of an excellent standard.
From your local comic shop, digitally, or online at IDWpublishing.com

The New Ghostbusters #2 IDW ComicBook

The New Ghostbusters #2 IDW ComicBook
The New Ghostbusters #2 IDW ComicBook
So there has been an inter dimensional accident and the ghostbusters have disappeared. But all is not lost – the state of New York has found some funds and recruited a new team, but this time they are trained and (mainly) women! Following a rather degrading costume change and photo shoot the team, consisting of Staffer Janine Meinitz, FBI Agent Melanie Ortiz, Occult bookstore manager Kylie Griffin and returning tech support Ron Alexander, set off in search of a ghost in central park…

… in the meantime, in a dimension not actually that far away, the original Ghostbusters Peter, Ray, Winston and Egon are consulting their kit, and working out if its going to be possible to ‘get home’.

A nice little B strip looks at the lives of ghosts captured and trapped in the prison dimension, plus the wordy bit makes mention of Dr Who, Sandman, and Miyazaki.

This series looks to be suitably true to the Ghostbusters we all know, and is written by Erik Burnham, with art by him and Dan Schoening, and colours by Luis Antonio

Ghostbusters #2 Is released 13th March 2013

The ghost of a notorious killer has begun to haunt New York, and The New Ghostbusters have to stop him before he can pick up where he left off! Meanwhile, the Original Ghostbusters compare notes—trying to figure out where they are, and how to get home… 

Full Colour • 32 pages • $3.99

Features all-new REAL GHOSTBUSTERS 2-page back-up stories written and drawn by Erik Burnham in every issue!

Dungeons and Dragons Classics, Volume Four

D&D Classics Vol 4
D&D Classics Vol 4
IDW continue to pull together classic series for release as Trade paper backs. Amongst others, this week sees Dungeons and Dragons Classics, volume four; the collected issues of Advanced Dungeons and Dragons magazine 1991/92. With a romping good story, reading it is utterly reminiscent of playing the 2nd Edition Game, probably over findus crispy pancakes, with pepsi, cheesy wotsits and your mum calling up the stairs, telling you its a lovely day, so why aren’t you outside. Just as it should be when one was fortunate enough to have a good dungeon master, the story builds the team from an individual in inauspicious circumstances, right up to a wonderful melange incorporating all the expected classes, races and ‘professions’ by the battle royale at the end. This collection sees that arc run from initial trap (murder/set up) to resolution taking in the quest for the Dragon’s Eye, some elves, the usual every issue sword fight, some more dwarves and a whole lot of magic without the need to use words. And being the early 90’s, a good mix of female and male characters.

Just as with volumes 1 to 3, and indeed in the games themselves, the same basic story line is adhered to, there’s a touch of the female gaze, there is surprisingly little sexism; and Yes, It does show that sometimes there is a lot of dross, but usually its the oldies that deliver the goods. The artwork is naive by current standards, and the colouring also that of the earlier pressure-based printing processes – no digital retouching here. Whilst its available in a digital format, I’d personally seek this out on paper, stick my nose right in for the smell of fresh print, and sink back into one of those secret pleasures from our teenaged years.